White Culture : Values and beliefs

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Posted (edited) · Report post

CLICK THE LINK BELOW AND SEE SOME ELEMENTS OF WHITE CULTURE BROKEN DOWN

The Components of White Culture: Values and Beliefs

Edited by Bula Matali

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Posted · Report post

The values and beliefs that underpin a culture or a group of people ultimately determine the "performance or lack thereof" of that group of people.

As Ghanaians we need to look at the cultural values and beliefs that underpin our lifestyle. Until we straighten out this core area we will flounder on this national "development" journey that we are on.

We believe and practice too many absurd things....

Bula Matali

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Posted · Report post

I definitely agree that these represent white, American values in a very broad way....so how do African or West African or Ghanaian values differ from these?

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The Components of Black Culture: Values and Beliefs

Rugged Communality

An Individual is part of the community

An Individual's primary responsibilities are to his family and community

Working towards Community well being is highly valued and rewarded

An Individual cannot control the environment alone without working in harmony with nature and its own time tested rules

Life is not about winning but living a good memorial in the minds of the community (Thats the only way to qualify to be an ancestor)

Winning is not everything

No Win/Lose dichotomy

Action Orientation with regards to the feelings of others

Must understand and live in harmony with nature

Must always do something about a situation in consultation with the bigger family

Pragmatic but would accede to what will benefit the community more

The way and manner of Communication is valued greatly (its the child who knows how to wash his hands well, that eats with the elders).

Exploits the diversity of language and style

Oral tradition

The young will usually defer to the elderly. Speaking the elderly with Direct eye contact is disrespectful

Encourages physical contact

Man is an emotional being

Time is the white man's invention.

Life is lived not spent

Doesnt need Holidays bcos there is harmony and peace in own environment

Based on African traditional religion

Based on the good lifes of worthy ancestors that passed to the world beyond

Being at peace with all is cardinal. War is only necessary if evil seeks to disrupt good order. Romanticises brave men.

Work is part of living.

Working hard does not necessarily bring success. Success is a product of honesty, diligence and the blessings of the creator.

Progress & Future Orientation. Earthly life is only a preparation towards a more lasting after life.

Plan for future - future involves life hereafter

Delayed gratification if it serves the wellbeing of the larger community

Value continual improvement and progress

Emphasis on acquiring time tested principles that have been handed down over the years.

Objective, rational, linear/spatial thinking

Cause and effect relationships

Qualitative emphasis

Status and Power doesnt matter, a good name does.

Measured by the worth of knowledge and good character that he bequeaths

Credentials, titles, and positions does not make a man

Believe the tried and tested system of the worthy ancestors

Believe this system is better than other systems

Leaving a good legacy

Family Structure

Extended family is the ideal social unit

Male is breadwinner and the head of the household

Female is homemaker and subordinate to the husband

Patriarchal structure

Aesthetics

Music and art based on African cultures

Women's beauty based on black, full breasted, well shaped hips and buttocks, young with dimples. Has meat on the bones.

Men's attractiveness based on athletic ability, power, good natured

Religion

Belief in African Traditions

No tolerance for deviation from single God concept with the ancestors being the conduit through which access in granted to the Supreme being.

This is Papa Goody's version of the African man.

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Posted · Report post

Family Structure

Extended family is the ideal social unit

Male is breadwinner and the head of the household

Female is homemaker and subordinate to the husband

Patriarchal structure

Aesthetics

The female is also a spiritual and an important person in the family unit. without th efemale a clan would cease.

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Posted · Report post

BDoll,

Your insertion is apt. Thanks

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Family Structure

Extended family is the ideal social unit

Male is breadwinner and the head of the household

Female is homemaker and subordinate to the husband

Patriarchal structure

Aesthetics

The female is also a spiritual  and an important person in the family unit. without th efemale  a clan would cease.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

True dat!

The female is the one that keeps it all together. I.E. Big Momma.

I believe we all have one of those in the family. Even if she's an aunt or cousin, she still get the title "Big Momma"

Definition of Big Momma:

caregiver

mommy

daddy

teacher

counselor

breadwinner

giver

helper

preacher

negoiator

mediator

friend

advisor

fighter

planner

cooks

cleans

has dreams that come to pass, lol

...she makes the best cakes too!

One

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Posted (edited) · Report post

I always hear and read how Ghanaians are a friendly, loving people who place a lot of value on family. Yet I also know some Ghanaians who won't answer the phone when relatives call because they say the relatives are only calling for money. Or they no longer associate with their extended families because the extended family never helped them when they needed help, but expect help from this person. (Hope that makes sense, it's hard to keep names out of it)

So do you think colonialism has caused a breakdown of the family values Ghanaians hold dear?

Would you say all the friction between ethnic groups in Ghana were caused by colonialism?

Example:I know an Ewe who doesn't respect/like (not sure if those are the right words for it) Ashanti's because he thinks all they go for is $. He has a superior attitude that Ewe's are all well educated and therefore better. I can't remember what he said about Fante's and Ga's. He doesn't like African Americans calling themselves "African" either. He says they are American because they do not have cultural unity with Africa any more. To me, this is just another form of prejudice - not sure if anyone else sees it that way.

The values I was raised with was that family was everything and came first before anyone else including friends. As women, we were expected to wait hand and foot on the man. The man was the bread winner who worked outside the home and the "little woman" was expected to keep house and take care of the kids. Women and children were to be seen and not heard. In otherwise, in my opinion, second class because if we did speak up to express our opinions, the men always raised their voices louder so we couldn't be heard. The man was the head of the household in an absolute fashion. God forbid my father would ever wash a dish or vacuum! While my father's job ended once he left and he came home, had a beer and put his feet up, my mother's job was 24/7. The only time she got real rest was when she had pneumonia and was hospitalized. Female children were not expected to go to college (which is ironic, because if we didn't bring the top grades home from school, we were grounded and not allowed to play until we studied hard enough to bring the grades up), they were expected to remain home with their parents until they married. Male children were expected to follow in their father's footsteps and to exceed in school. My father is a first generation American - my grandfather was a naturalized citizen from Quebec, Canada.

(I couldn't open the link you posted Bula - my internet at home stinks)

Edited by ReggaeDancer

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Posted (edited) · Report post

RD, i would answer you very shortly, its true that ghanaians place a value on family ties but there is a ghanaian saying which goes .....' efie bia, mensah wom'..... which translates there is a mensah in every house. (mensah is a name which translate also as third born)

This means that as much ghanaians have a trait to be identified with, not every ghanaian would possess this trait.

The Ashanti's look after thier own a lot, they tend to look after thier parents children and thier uncles child where as Fantes who are also akans just like the ahsantis but speak a different dialect of the same language only extend thier family ties to the Nuclear family.

Edited by babydoll1

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Posted · Report post

RD,  i would answer you very shortly, its true that ghanaians place a value on family ties but there is  a ghanaian saying which goes .....' efie bia, mensah wom'..... which translates there is  a mensah in every house. (mensah is  a name which translate also as third born)

This means that as much ghanaians have a trait to be identified with, not every ghanaian would possess this trait.

The Ashanti's look after thier own a lot, they tend to look after thier parents children and thier uncles child where as Fantes who are also akans just like the ahsantis but speak a different dialect of the same language only extend thier family ties to the Nuclear family.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Thanks, BDoll - that would explain why when my husband's dad died and they were asked to leave his house, they went with his maternal uncles? My husband's maternal uncles took him in so to speak as he went to work for them after they paid his school fees. (He is an Ashanti)

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Posted · Report post

The Ashanti's used to inherit maternally, and in so doing it

was the nephew (maternally) who inherited the property and

not the children. Now inheritance unless in special cases is in

Ghana father to child(ren).

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