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#26 Guest_Ebonygirl_*

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 04:31 PM

I have the surname Peprah-Boadu. I get asked if the Peprah is Spanish and if the we were ruled by the Spanish. When I tell them that isn't so, the become shocked. Does anyone have anymore info about the origin of my surname?

#27 tufle

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 04:48 PM

Ebony....Peprah-Boadu is an Akan compound name. Possibly Ashanti. I dont know any Spanish so i cant tell if its related to a spanish word. I can however tell U that in our history a lot of them Babylonians (Europeans) passed by.....The Portugese, The Spanish, The Germans, The Dutch, The Danes etc....

So your name could possibly be a corruption of an original akan name.

#28 Bula Matali

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 04:58 PM

The Origin and Significance of Ghanaian Personal Names

WHEN God created the first man and later provided him with a mate, He gave to each a name. The man called Adam, which means “red earth,” and the woman Eve, signifying “life.”
The Akans in Ghana have a proverb: Onyankopon mpe asemmone nti no okyedin mmiako mmiako, meaning because God does favor misdeeds, He gave a name. Another similar proverb is: Ade bone nti na woto din mmiako mmiako, which means the same thing.

Ghanians believe that a name is a religious mark of identification and a sign of honor and respect. A good name is therefore treasured far more than anything else. This belief is again expressed vividly in the following philosophic statement: Onipa begyee din na wammeye hwee ara, meaning, man was born to make a good name above all things. The giving of a name to a person is therefore considered an important act in Ghanaian society. From his infancy, the Ghanaian is made believe that the name he bears has something to do with the building and molding of his character, great care and thought are therefore taken when selecting names for children.

Every Ghanaian has at least two main parts to his name. The first part of this name is the Kradin (soul’s name). This indicates the particular day on which one is born. It is therefore a name acquired by fate or chance. The kradin of a child is pronounced by the midwife or the person who attends the mother at the time of delivery and is therefore in the position to certify the exact day of birth.

A few examples may help to illustrate the Akradin: A baby born on Sunday may be called Kwesi. Akwasi, Kwashie(male) or Asi, Esi, Akosua (female). Tuesday: Kwabena, kobia (male) or Abena, Araba, Abia (female); Wednesday: Kwaku, Kweku (male) or Akua, Aku, Akuba (female); Thursday: Yaw, Kwaw (male) or Yaa, Aba, (female); Friday: Kofi (male) or Afua, Afi, Afiba (female); Saturday: kwame(male) or Amma, Ami, ame(female).

The second part of a Ghanaian personal ,name is the Agyadin (father’s name). It is the name chosen by the child’s father and given at a formal outdooring. This second name is also termed abadin (child’s name) which stands for the surname or the abusuadin (family name).

Outdooring Ceremony

The outdooring ceremony is observed by almost all the ethic groups of the country. Although the observance may differ slightly in procedure from region to region, the substance and concept backing it remain the same. Outdooring takes place very early in the morning and is observed on the eight day of the birth of a child. It is the belief of the all Ghanaians that the baby remains attached to its spirit world for the first seven days. So babies are kept indoors and are not allowed to the yard of the house, during the first week. The baby is believed to have become a human being on the eighth day. In fact, if the child should pass away before the seventh day, there is no mourning for that child.

Early in the morning about 5 o’clock, the child to be named is brought to the yard of the house for the first time by its mother and placed on the ground below the eaves. After a while he is taken indoors and the naming ceremony begins. The baby is placed on the lap of the person after whom it is to named, if he is alive, or an elder male member of the father’s family. Libation, generally of gin or schnapps, is poured to invoke the blessing of family ancestors on behalf of the newly-born baby.

The officiating member then pronounces the name of the baby by addressing it in the manner: “Kofi, your name is Okae. May God give you long life and make you great. Your grandfather did great things. He was truthful, honest and kind. May you grow to be like him.” With a finger he then puts three drops of water into the baby’s mouth. Followed by three drops of wine, and in the process addresses the child as follows: “learn to recognize water as such and as distinct from wine. You have come to stay and not merely to make a brief appearance. Do not come to show yourself fancifully and then fly away. May God bless you to live to a grand old age.” The ceremony of water and wine symbolizes that the child should be guided by truth in all his future undertakings.

It is usual at this stage for the father to give to give a golden-ring to be put on the baby’s finger and to offer gifts to both his wife and the child. Gifts are also presented by relatives and guests. Refreshments are then served. The ceremony is rounded of by the guests standing to shake hands with the husband and his wife, saying. Mo tiri nkwaa oo! (May God bless you). The child is also introduced to the community, because the child does not just belong to one person, the child is part of the community. The community is instructed that this is their child and that they must look out for and help raise the child. At the same time, the child is told what is expected of him or her.

Sources of Surnames

The second main part of the of the Ghanaian name, to some extent, helps one to know of which family a child is a member. That is why this part of the name is termed abusuadin (family name). This is chosen from a list of ancestral names of the father’s line of descent. For example, one can easily trace the lineage of the Abbeys, Sackeyfios, Laryeas in Accra; the Djabanors and Odjidjas in Krobo; the Larbis and Okantas in Larteh; the Kisseishs and Akunors in Ada and so on. Some Northern Ghanaian personal names are Musa Frafra - Musa of the Frafra tribe; Maama Dagomba - Maama of Dagomba; Atenga Mosi - Atenga of Mosi; Isifu Dagate - Isifu of Dagate, etc. In choosing this name it is the duty of the father to put into account the general conduct and behavior of the particular ancestor.


source http://www.susubiribi.com/naming.html

Ghana
Several things should be noted about Ghanaian naming customs:

Surnames are often not the same for all persons in a family. Often each child is given a different surname, which may be different from that of the parents or grandparents. Family surnames are more common in Cape Coast and Accra.
Sometimes in Ghana the father's given name is given to his son as a surname.
Married women did not take their husband's surnames until recently. They now will often retain their maiden name until the marriage is registered.

Children are often given native names at birth and a "Christian" name when they go to school. The Christian name is usually taken from the Bible and westernized. It holds some cultural prestige. The native names given at birth are generally derived from the day of the week of their birth and the names Papa (father), Mama (mother), and Nana may be given at birth to honor a famous relative.

The following table shows the names associated with various days of the week from the Fanti language (F) and the Ashanti (A) language (female names may have Ewura added to the beginning of the name or Ewuraba which means lady):

Day Male Female
Sunday F-Kwesi
A-Akwasi
F-Esi
A-Akosua

Monday F-Kojo, Kodwo (Paakojo means named after the father)
A-Kwadwo
F-Adjoa, Adwoa
A-Adjoa

Tuesday F-Kobina, Ebow, Ebo
A-Kwabena
F-Araba, Abena
A-Abenaa

Wednes-day F-Kweku, Abeku, Kuku
A-Kwaku, Agyeku (named after father or grandfather)
F-Ekua, Ewurakua
A-Akua (sounds like Akuya)

Thursday F-Ekow, Kow, Paakow (named after father)
A-Yaw, Yoa
F-Aba (Baaba is a nickname)
A-Yaa, Yawa

Friday F-Kofi, Fiifi
A-Kofi
F-Efua
A-Afua

Saturday F-Ato, Kwamina (or both)
A-Kwame
F-Ama
A-Amma, Serwah (or both)


Other native names include the following:

Nii/Naa Male and female names from Ga tribe, prevalent around the city of Accra, may indicate royal blood.
Donkor Child born after mother had 2-3 babies die. Three tribal cuts from the corner of each eye or sides of the mouth may be made as a token of honor.
Nana Either gender, named after an older relative. Nana sometimes precedes the weekday name, indicating the person is named for a grandfather or grandmother (e.g. Nana Kofi Mensah). It may also indicate the person is a chief or village elder.
Akwate/ Akuete
Oko/Akuete
Names for male twins given in the Ga tribe

If two children are born on the same day of the week, they may be given the same name with one of them abbreviated.
The designation for senior and junior may include one of the following meanings:

A child (junior) named after his parent or grandparent (senior)
Twins with the same name (The firstborn is considered the youngest as he came first to prepare the way of the elder child. For example, twins born on a Sunday may be called Kwesi Ata Kakra (Kewsi the younger, born first) and Kwesi Ata Panin (Kwesi the elder).
Siblings who were born several years apart, but given the same name
A child dies and the next child in the family is given the same name
The last child of one wife and the first child of the next wife have the same name.

In recording family information, it is helpful to list all the names a person used during his or her life.


source http://www.progeneal...ingpatterns.htm
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#29 ReggaeDancer

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 11:42 PM

so japanese... think japanese rice beer.


LOL that would explain it - so not a beer drinker! Can't stand the taste of beer! Give me Rum!

i have a double barrelled surname.

the first part I think is just from the Ashanti royal house...

the second part was actually made up by my great,great, great grandfather. He was apparently given 3 different names on top of his day name and his father's name. He decided that it was too long but he wanted to pass it on to his son because they meant a lot to him. So he cut them short, he took the first 2 letters from the first one, the middle 3 from the second and the last 2 from the last... Over the years parts of the family have added letters here and there.. but my father kept the original...

I guess that surname means 3 different things...


no disrepect to anyone, but it seems so many claim to be of royal lineage - is it really THAT important?

When my husband told me who he was related to, I was like and that makes you better because???? So, my family were poor sharecroppers - does that mean you are better than me? I don't think so.

Sorry derailed the Ghanaian name thread - thanks for the update Bula. Very interesting.
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#30 Ewiase

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 02:12 AM

[quote name='Bula Matali' date='Dec 16 2005, 04:58 PM' post='58175']
[quote]The Origin and Significance of Ghanaian Personal Names

The Akans in Ghana have a proverb: Onyankopon mpe asemmone nti no okyedin mmiako mmiako, meaning because God does favor misdeeds, He gave a name. Another similar proverb is: Ade bone nti na woto din mmiako mmiako, which means the same thing.


[/quote]

the translation should read "because God does not favor misdeeds...."
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

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#31 Ewiase

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 02:34 AM

no disrepect to anyone, but it seems so many claim to be of royal lineage - is it really THAT important?

When my husband told me who he was related to, I was like and that makes you better because???? So, my family were poor sharecroppers - does that mean you are better than me? I don't think so.

Sorry derailed the Ghanaian name thread - thanks for the update Bula. Very interesting.


RD, it is not a derailment but bringing us to another level.

royal lineage is really important especially to Akans and for that matter Ashantis. it is not for nothing
that i have added NANA to my name and i am now known as Nana Kwaku Agyei-Sarpong.

the Nana goes to show that i am a royal, by the way almost every Ashanti is a royal, which i am proud of.

my relationship to some one of importance is mostly important in our culture because of alliances and
(village) politics. it is easy to get what you want if you are in a way connected to the Chief or King. it is easily achieved when you a close to the throne, but if the relationship is a long one, then you do not matter. you only matter if you can dig deep into your pocket.

your family being poor sharecroppers can mean that i am better than you in a village because of the clan, but the opposite can be true in another village. you and your family has a clan and in a village which is ruled by your clan you may be reffered to as Nana ReggaeDancer. :smilie_laugh:
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

if a lie takes the lift and the truth the stairs, the lie will be faster, but the truth will get there too.

#32 Guest_Just passing thru_*

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 05:34 AM


no disrepect to anyone, but it seems so many claim to be of royal lineage - is it really THAT important?

When my husband told me who he was related to, I was like and that makes you better because???? So, my family were poor sharecroppers - does that mean you are better than me? I don't think so.

Sorry derailed the Ghanaian name thread - thanks for the update Bula. Very interesting.


RD, it is not a derailment but bringing us to another level.

royal lineage is really important especially to Akans and for that matter Ashantis. it is not for nothing
that i have added NANA to my name and i am now known as Nana Kwaku Agyei-Sarpong.

the Nana goes to show that i am a royal, by the way almost every Ashanti is a royal, which i am proud of.

my relationship to some one of importance is mostly important in our culture because of alliances and
(village) politics. it is easy to get what you want if you are in a way connected to the Chief or King. it is easily achieved when you a close to the throne, but if the relationship is a long one, then you do not matter. you only matter if you can dig deep into your pocket.

your family being poor sharecroppers can mean that i am better than you in a village because of the clan, but the opposite can be true in another village. you and your family has a clan and in a village which is ruled by your clan you may be reffered to as Nana ReggaeDancer. :smilie_laugh:



Thanks a lot for explaining that, I wouldn't have been able to explain that any better. Maybe people who have a difficult time understanding this shd think about the Shrivers, Kennedys and what nots In the US, and all this Royal stuff will make a lof of sense.

And U are right, royalty is more of a big deal to us Ashantis than it is to other tribes in Ghana. I am a proud Adansi (Agona Abusua) lady, and I am proud of that. My grandpaa was Bretuo, and I am always proud to mention that. This are all things I have just recently learnt and it makes me proud to know that we have such a rich culture and beautiful history to boot.

People who do not understand shd ask and stop hating! I am out like that!

#33 Ewiase

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 08:42 AM

People who do not understand shd ask and stop hating! I am out like that!


my wofasee, there is no hatred in this. it is sometimes confusing and mostly
we can not explain it when asked.

btw, my son-in-law is also an Adansi and i know Adansi too.
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

if a lie takes the lift and the truth the stairs, the lie will be faster, but the truth will get there too.

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 11:50 AM


People who do not understand shd ask and stop hating! I am out like that!


my wofasee, there is no hatred in this. it is sometimes confusing and mostly
we can not explain it when asked.

btw, my son-in-law is also an Adansi and i know Adansi too.


Well, I guess I said so because sometimes people who do not understand it get an attitude about it. I f U know what I mean.
And ur son-in-law, I am sure he is quite the gentleman.

#35 Ewiase

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 01:35 PM

And ur son-in-law, I am sure he is quite the gentleman.


i only hope he will not check if we lock our door when we go to sleep, now that
he will be busy with my daughter.

:smilie_laugh: :smilie_laugh: :smilie_laugh:
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

if a lie takes the lift and the truth the stairs, the lie will be faster, but the truth will get there too.

#36 thinfox

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Posted 17 December 2005 - 04:31 PM


no disrepect to anyone, but it seems so many claim to be of royal lineage - is it really THAT important?

When my husband told me who he was related to, I was like and that makes you better because???? So, my family were poor sharecroppers - does that mean you are better than me? I don't think so.

Sorry derailed the Ghanaian name thread - thanks for the update Bula. Very interesting.


RD, it is not a derailment but bringing us to another level.

royal lineage is really important especially to Akans and for that matter Ashantis. it is not for nothing
that i have added NANA to my name and i am now known as Nana Kwaku Agyei-Sarpong.

the Nana goes to show that i am a royal, by the way almost every Ashanti is a royal, which i am proud of.

my relationship to some one of importance is mostly important in our culture because of alliances and
(village) politics. it is easy to get what you want if you are in a way connected to the Chief or King. it is easily achieved when you a close to the throne, but if the relationship is a long one, then you do not matter. you only matter if you can dig deep into your pocket.

your family being poor sharecroppers can mean that i am better than you in a village because of the clan, but the opposite can be true in another village. you and your family has a clan and in a village which is ruled by your clan you may be reffered to as Nana ReggaeDancer. :smilie_laugh:



Not to be confused, you can also become 'Nana' just by old age or when you get Grand children.
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#37 Ewiase

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Posted 18 December 2005 - 01:19 AM

Not to be confused, you can also become 'Nana' just by old age or when you get Grand children.


in old age you are called Abrewa or Akokora, though at times you hear Nana
Abrewa, but seldom Nana Akokora.

the role of the grand-children let's you into the importance Ghanians have for
children. it brings joy when you hear that sound, Nana, from your grand-child.
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

if a lie takes the lift and the truth the stairs, the lie will be faster, but the truth will get there too.

#38 ReggaeDancer

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Posted 19 December 2005 - 09:46 PM


no disrepect to anyone, but it seems so many claim to be of royal lineage - is it really THAT important?

When my husband told me who he was related to, I was like and that makes you better because???? So, my family were poor sharecroppers - does that mean you are better than me? I don't think so.

Sorry derailed the Ghanaian name thread - thanks for the update Bula. Very interesting.


RD, it is not a derailment but bringing us to another level.

royal lineage is really important especially to Akans and for that matter Ashantis. it is not for nothing
that i have added NANA to my name and i am now known as Nana Kwaku Agyei-Sarpong.

the Nana goes to show that i am a royal, by the way almost every Ashanti is a royal, which i am proud of.

my relationship to some one of importance is mostly important in our culture because of alliances and
(village) politics. it is easy to get what you want if you are in a way connected to the Chief or King. it is easily achieved when you a close to the throne, but if the relationship is a long one, then you do not matter. you only matter if you can dig deep into your pocket.

your family being poor sharecroppers can mean that i am better than you in a village because of the clan, but the opposite can be true in another village. you and your family has a clan and in a village which is ruled by your clan you may be reffered to as Nana ReggaeDancer. :smilie_laugh:


Ok, so my husband's eldest brother is called Nana, but his mother was pushed out of the family house after her husband died and her brothers ended up sometimes taking care of her. So is it only the eldest it is passed through?

I do know of the Shrivers and Kennedys but do not consider them royalty. They are people just like me, only they have attained political power through money. If I had money, I would also attain political power. The two go hand and hand.

I think the time of Kings and Queens is long past. I was only asking because it does seem that all Ashanti's I have met claimed to be of royal blood however far removed they were to the actual King or Queen. I was once accused of stealing a royal man (my husband) so I was curious how it worked in your society.

I could claim to be descended of the Kings/Queens in France but it doesn't make it true. Do you understand what I am getting at?

As always, thank you Ewiase. You are a scholar and a gentleman.
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#39 ToureEl

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Posted 28 October 2006 - 05:03 PM

it is never true that surname was handed over from father to son in the years
before. you are given a name at birth and that becomes your name till death,
but if you are lucky or unlucky you get a nickname that sticks to you.

an example is my fathers name is Kofi Sarpong and he decides to name me
after his uncle because he is a successful farmer, i get his name Kwaku Agyei.
it can even happen that i was not born on wednesday.

you can verify this with the birth date of older people and youwill see what i
mean. we starterd using our father's surname with the coming of the abrofo
and even then we sometimes make it compound like Kwaku Agyei-Sarpong.


whts the meaning of sarpong?

#40 Bula Matali

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Posted 30 October 2006 - 03:57 PM

I have no idea what Sarpong means. It is often used as a Family name ( surname)
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#41 ToureEl

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 06:19 PM

I have no idea what Sarpong means. It is often used as a Family name ( surname)


can you find out?

#42 Ewiase

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Posted 01 November 2006 - 09:58 PM

can you find out?


it can always be done, but what is your interest?
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

if a lie takes the lift and the truth the stairs, the lie will be faster, but the truth will get there too.

#43 greensuave

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 02:36 PM

I was told by an Iranian that my Ghanaian surname means sky in their language. I thought that was interesting.
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#44 babydoll1

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 04:29 PM

RD i think there are so many royals form the Akan side infact from all over ghana because every city, constituency, little town and area has its own chief. myself for instance my mothers dad is a chief of their hometown so im of royal blood. Im sure non royals outnumber royalty in ghana and frankly the status doesnt stand much. really.
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#45 ToureEl

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 08:12 PM



can you find out?


it can always be done, but what is your interest?


just doing some research on west african surnames..etc

#46 Ewiase

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Posted 02 November 2006 - 09:41 PM

RD i think there are so many royals form the Akan side infact from all over ghana because every city, constituency, little town and area has its own chief. myself for instance my mothers dad is a chief of their hometown so im of royal blood. Im sure non royals outnumber royalty in ghana and frankly the status doesnt stand much. really.


Babydoll, you are not a royal, because if your maternal grandfather is a chief in Akan the lineage is maternal and so your mother is a commoner and so are you. on the other hand if your maternal grandmother is royal, then you are also a royal.
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

if a lie takes the lift and the truth the stairs, the lie will be faster, but the truth will get there too.

#47 babydoll1

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Posted 03 November 2006 - 11:47 AM

Ah uncle as i said im of royal blood and not a royal. Now i'm assuming people in similar circumstances would describe themselves as so and hence it would seem a lot of Akans/ghanaians are royals and not of royal blood.

I would also like to know more about the concept of surnames in ghana originating from colonial rules, i was under the impression that the first asantehene heir was before colonial rule and if i remember right that lineage had a particular surname so ho wdoes it work out that colonial masters brought the culture of surnames to ghana?

Edited by babydoll1, 03 November 2006 - 11:48 AM.

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#48 ReggaeDancer

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Posted 18 December 2006 - 09:16 PM

RD i think there are so many royals form the Akan side infact from all over ghana because every city, constituency, little town and area has its own chief. myself for instance my mothers dad is a chief of their hometown so im of royal blood. Im sure non royals outnumber royalty in ghana and frankly the status doesnt stand much. really.


I was just curious because a woman I met made a big deal about marrying into an Ashanti royal family. Also my ex-brother in law works with a Ghanaian who said he is royalty and when his father died, he had to shave his head and went home for one month.

Honestly, anyone could claim royalty outside of Ghana and gullible Americans would believe them.

My husband is a very proud Ashanti and my ex was a very proud Ewe. My husband said he was distantly related to royalty - I think it was his uncle. He also has some uncles who are pretty high up in the government. My ex never claimed any royal blood, but claimed Ewe's were better than the other groups because they valued and sought out higher eduation whilst Fanti's were only after a quick buck (his words, not mine).
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Posted 09 May 2007 - 04:40 PM

Does anybody know the meaning of "Tutu", by chance? I have heard of Nana Osei Tutu (Ashanti royalty, I believe). There is an area on my island named Tutu and I think there might be some relationship. By the way, does Desmond Tutu have any relation to the Ashantis named Tutu??

#50 Ewiase

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 04:59 AM

Does anybody know the meaning of "Tutu", by chance? I have heard of Nana Osei Tutu (Ashanti royalty, I believe). There is an area on my island named Tutu and I think there might be some relationship. By the way, does Desmond Tutu have any relation to the Ashantis named Tutu??


i do not know the meaning of "Tutu", but you are right that Nana Osei Tutu is the king of Ashanti. there is also a town called Tutu in Ghana. there is no known link between Archbishop Tutu and the Ashantis.
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