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National Dress Code?


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#1 Guest_PeculiarVIrtue_*

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Posted 20 July 2007 - 02:18 AM

Here's an excerpt from a writer's opinion about modern Ghana not having a standard dress code. What do the rest of you think?

SOME people expressed disappointment by the President’s appearance in suit, a European attire, on the 50th anniversary of Ghana’s Independence at the parade grounds, the Independence Square, Accra, a parade which was telecasted worldwide. To them, the President betrayed our culture, our identity.

Nkrumah coined the term African personality and deepened the concept of African (Ghanaian) cultural identity to mean Black is Beauty and not shame.

At that time his rivals wore suits whilst he often wore kente cloth. He was later to popularise what has come to be called "political suit." He later scared his rivals with the Maoist type of suit worn by Communist Chinese politicians. It was neck deep and said to be "bullet proof."

In fact, General Obasanjo’s boubou and turban showed a striking contrast between Ghanaian and Nigerian culture and leadership. When it came to fashion no African country excels more than Nigeria whose neo-traditional culture is distinct and advance unlike the bawdy Ghanaians.

Almost everywhere in the world today, people are in a dilemma about tradition as against modernism. Never has change lacked human feelings.

Everything is effected by hi-technology and mass production even food-genetically modified foods, a cheapness extolled by only higher quality and low costs.

Soyinka in the Lion and the Jewel says "I do not hate progress except that it makes all roofs and faces look the same."

The roundness of Soyinka is that he extols both cultural and philosophical identity alike. What does a beautiful boubou make you in a country where corruption is the norm or standard practice? Plunder of State assets is unfelt.

In Ghana, it is easy to say "I am a Ghanaian" (culture) but hard to say" in the name of Ghana" (patriotism).

Most Ghanaians are traditionalists by word and crossover Westerners in action.


#2 thinfox

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Posted 21 July 2007 - 04:09 PM

there's no national dress code that i'm aware of but recently, public servants are allowed to wear their own "african attire " instead of their regular uniform. most politicians tend to wear suits though. we're loosing our culture alright and the need to do so is built into the system. for example in the school system, more than 90% of children enter the education system not speaking/understanding a word of the english language. yet, the language of instruction is english and a child caught speaking vernacular could get his/her ass whooped with a cane.
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#3 Ewiase

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Posted 22 July 2007 - 06:37 AM

i think the writer is somewhat right.

dress code of Northern Ghana
Posted Image

dress code of Southern Ghana
Posted Image

more pictures
http://www.ghanaweb....y.php?ID=108176
neke gyen ne yoo?

saa ena Ewiase etee?


is this how the world is?

if a lie takes the lift and the truth the stairs, the lie will be faster, but the truth will get there too.

#4 IBRAHIM MUNIRU KOBILLA

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 07:07 PM

i think the writer is somewhat right.

dress code of Northern Ghana
Posted Image


The dress code if Northern Ghana is the Smock.
The picture aboves shows the dress code for the average muslim in the North
and even in the South. Sometimes, the Rich people dress that way too.
Hausa's dress this way most of the time

#5 Guest_zain doc_*

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 12:25 PM

The roundness of Soyinka is that he extols both cultural and philosophical identity alike. What does a beautiful boubou make you in a country where corruption is the norm or standard practice? Plunder of State assets is unfelt.


While I do not want to jump to conclusions as per the meaning of the italicised comment above, I think it is unfair to paint the whole of Nigeria with the same brush. It's myopic (sorry to say) to colour Nigeria's image by an action perpetrated by just a small percentage of Nigerians. Moreso, when the statement does not seem to buttress your point. Thanks.




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